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Highdown School
and Sixth Form Centre

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WHAT DOES EXCELLENCE LOOK LIKE IN EACH SUBJECT IN YEAR 8?

 

ART 

Students who are exceeding the expectations in Art and Design will typically be providing evidence of achievement which consistently extends their learning beyond the confines of the task. They are working in ways which show deeper understanding and mastery and which are above the norm for their peer group. There are four keys areas in which students will demonstrate excellence:

Knowledge [AO1]

  • Knowledge through independent research about other artists, designers and craftspeople
  • Learn about materials and techniques by studying the work of others
  • Understand and explain how different types of art and design can convey mood
  • Understand why artists created their work and what the ideas behind the work were
  • Understand the context behind certain pieces of art
  • Use specialist vocabulary when describing own and others work

Making [AO2]

  • Design & develop ideas
  • Try out different materials and techniques
  • Evaluate experimentation
  • Extend practical skills by using their sketchbook independently
  • Use different materials, techniques and processes with confidence

Generating Ideas [AO3]

  • Show skills in recording using line and tone
  • Explore other ways of collecting information
  • Experiment with drawing to produce expressive work
  • Understand and apply the visual elements
  • Skilfully record from observation
  • Produce independent high quality observational drawing

Completion and Evaluation [AO4]

  • Thoughtfully evaluate their own work and that of others against success criteria to identify actions needed to strengthen their work
  • Realise intentions; produce a high quality final piece
  • Demonstrate interesting presentation throughout sketchbooks
  • Present final ideas

CHINESE MANDARIN

Reading
  • Recognise 2 tenses with a range of time phrases.
  • Understand details in a simple sentence and
  • translate it from TL-English with no ambiguity.
  • Understand most information in a paragraph in spite of distracters and answer questions in English with good accuracy.
  • Understand most ideas in authentic material.

Writing

  • Write information in simple sentences with attempt at complex structures.
  • Express opinions and reasons with a range of vocabulary.
  • Most characters are accurately written.
  • Translate simple sentences from English to Chinese with minor lapses in accuracy/ communication.

Speaking

  • Present information in simple sentences with attempt at complex structures.
  • Respond to known and unpredictable questions with a range of sentences structures.
  • Express opinions and reasons with a range of vocabulary.
  • Ask simple questions in target language with attempt at complex structures.
  • Use accurate pronunciation and intonation in order to be understood. 

Listening

  • Understand 2 tenses with a range of time phrases.
  • Understand details in a simple statement and answer relevant questions with good accuracy.
  • Understand most information in a conversation in spite of distracters and answer questions in English with good accuracy.
  • Understand most ideas in authentic material.

COMPUTING 

Computer Science

  • Identify internal and external components within a computer system and describe their purpose.
  • Explain the similarities and differences between computerised everyday devices.
  • Explain how computers connect to the internet.
  • Identify benefits and limitations of using IT both inside and outside school.
  • Use IT safely and responsibly.
  • Describe people and events in the history of computing and make links between them.

Programming

  • Students describe more complex algorithms, for example, sorting or searching algorithms.
  • Students can describe systems and their components using diagrams.
  • Students can fully decompose a problem into its sub-problems and can make use of a notation to represent it.
  • Students can recognise similarities in given simple problems and able to produce a model which fits some aspects of these problems.
  • Students use programming interfaces to make predictions and vary the rules within the programs. Pupils assess the validity of their programs by considering or comparing alternative solutions.
  • Students are capable of independently writing a short program.
  • Students make use of procedures with parameters and functions returning values in their programs and are also able to manipulate 1-dimensional arrays.

DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY 

Design

  • Ability to produce 4 creative ideas, demonstrating knowledge of more than one 3D drawing technique.
  • Annotation of design ideas uses all ACCESSFM headings.
  • Able to produce a high quality development of one design idea

Practical

  • Students are able to select and use tools and equipment independently and accurately.
  • Students will finish challenging products to a high standard and demonstrate a high quality finish. 

Evaluation

  • Both design work and practical work is fully evaluated reflecting on key stages of the project.
  • Students demonstrate the ability to use feedback to suggest improvements for both the process and outcome of design and practical work.

DRAMA

Making

  • Students are able to express and explain relevant ideas and feelings, with some elaboration to make meaning explicit.
  • Students are confident and focused in group rehearsal and in the development of their performance – this has a positive impact on the rest of their group.
  • Students are beginning to explore more complex ideas and feelings
  • Students can show commitment to the drama lessons and are able to use performance skills and drama techniques without being prompted.
  • Students can recall drama skills and apply them appropriately to their practical work.

Performing

  • Students are able to show effective use of space, positioning and transitions.
  • Students contributions are positive and consistent.
  • Students are able to help lead and direct their group to a successful performance, showing confident and intelligent use of drama techniques.
  • Students are able to consider more deeply, the impact their work will have on the audience, and use this to develop the performance
  • Students can perform in different styles and show understanding of genres of performances.
  • Students can perform clear characters and there is use of voice, movement and gesture which is sustained within performance.

Responding

  • Students can evaluate the work of their peers and can suggest inventive and creative ways for them to improve their drama.
  • Students comments are increasingly independent.
  • Students can use drama vocabulary with a developing confidence and accuracy. They can support their views with relevant reasons.
  • Students can demonstrate an understanding of the theory of the style in use, and has awareness of the social, historical, political and cultural context of the work and the impact this has on the Drama.
  • Students can offer constructive comments about work with suggestions for improvement in written evaluation and use drama vocabulary correctly.

English 

Reading

  • critical selection of material to support ideas
  • critical evaluation of language and structure
  • critical evaluation of writer’s viewpoints
  • critical stance in contextual appreciation

Writing 

  • wide range of forms used for creative effect
  • distinctive range of personal style and voice to match intended purpose
  • imaginative and well-controlled structuring writing for whole text cohesion
  • precise, imaginative and successful use of sentence structures for effect
  • precise, imaginative and successful use of punctuation for effect
  • imaginative use of vocabulary for effect
  • accurate spelling throughout, including that of low frequency complex vocabulary

Speaking and Listening

  • explore wide range of subject matter with precision and confidence
  • manipulate talk according to context
  • challenge the thinking of others through choice of vocabulary and talk in group discussions
  • use role play to explore complex ideas with insight

ETHICS [Religious Education] 

  • Use religious and philosophical vocabulary. 
  • Explain why people belong to religions. 
  • Give detailed accounts of religions and beliefs, explaining the reasons for diversity within and between them. 
  • Explain why the impact of religions and beliefs on individuals, communities and societies varies. 
  • Interpret sources and arguments, explaining the reasons that are used in different ways by different traditions to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues. 
  • Interpret the significance of different forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression.
  • Use reasoning and examples to express insights into their own and others’ views on questions of identity and belonging.
  • Use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and world issues as well as questions of meaning and purpose and truth.
  • Use reasoning and examples to consider the challenges of belonging to a religion in the contemporary world, focusing on values and commitments.

French
 

Reading

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in both English and TL which includes unpredictable and unknown language.
  • Translate longer texts from TL-English with little ambiguity.
  • Use context/strategies to work out meaning of a text accurately.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a range of pronouns.
  • Understand where distracters are used.
  • Recognise a range of language features, e.g. comparatives, superlatives, negation, modal verbs and frequency expressions.

Writing

  • Translate longer passages into TL isolated errors.
  • Write longer, extended passages with little ambiguity/isolated errors.
  • Wide range of language features, e.g. three tenses with a range of pronouns and irregular verbs.
  • Very accurate spelling.
  • Use of more complex language features, e.g. range of negatives, complex opinions, modal verbs, comparatives and superlatives, range of justifications and frequency expressions. Some use of synonyms to avoid repetition
  • Coherent, relevant, sequenced ideas.

Speaking

  • Take part in an extended conversation with little ambiguity.
  • Almost all pronunciation and intonation accurate.
  • Respond to unpredictable questions with good spontaneity and accuracy.
  • Ask a wide range of questions accurately.
  • Use a wide range of language features eg. three tenses, all pronouns, comparatives and superlatives.
  • Apply grammatical knowledge to a range of new contexts/ manipulate language successfully.
  • Conversation sounds natural with student taking initiative. 

Listening

  • Give extended, accurate answers to comprehension questions in English and TL which includes unpredictable and unknown language (longer dialogue/monologue).
  • Use context/strategies to work out meaning of language accurately.
  • Recognise at least three tenses.
  • Understand where distracters are used.
  • Recognise comparatives, superlatives, negation, modal verbs and frequency expressions

Geography 

Geographical Enquiry
  • Confidently selects skills and strategies that are appropriate to the task and applies them effectively and accurately (e.g. deciding when to use statistical or graphical techniques)
  • Can gather, analyse and evaluate information in order to draw conclusions
  • Can confidently gather appropriate information to respond to a geographical enquiry / research task.

Geographical Skills and Application

  • Can follow and use a 16 point compass
  • Can confidently use maps from the smallest to the largest scale and understand how distance is represented
  • Can plot a range of data onto maps
  • Can interpret relief on maps using contours, spot heights and layer shading
  • Can confidently locate places & find places on maps using grid references – 4 & 6 figure.

Interdependence

  • Can explain in detail how things are considered sustainable (economic, social and environmental) and consider how these are interconnected at a variety of scales, with evidence and detailed consideration of multiplier effect/ knock-on effects.
  • Can evaluate the social, economic and environmental impacts of decisions at a variety of scales.
  • Can justify their own decisions and suggest solutions that consider a variety of factors.

Place

  • Explains physical and human characteristics of places using: knowledge of the UK and the wider world plus an understanding of a wide range of locations, contexts and scales
  • Can explain and begin to analyse how places and sequential processes can change (space and time), and how these affect the character of places
  • Understands how different viewpoints (including their own) may influence decisions in a place

history 

Source evaluation
  • You have combined and compared information from a range of sources in your answer
  • You have explained reasons why the sources can be viewed in different ways.
  • You have evaluated the content, origin and purpose of the sources to answer the question and reach a substantiated judgement.
  • You have applied detailed knowledge to evaluate the reliability of the sources 
  • You have successfully used own knowledge to assess the usefulness of the sources. 
  • Your conclusion will reach an overall judgement, using the sources and own knowledge to support your views

Interpretations

  • You have selected, organised and deployed accurate and relevant historical knowledge. This will be in your introduction and be used effectively and consistently throughout your answer
  • You show that you can understand and support at least two interpretations through the use of evidence
  • The answer is communicated well and historical terminology has been used throughout your answer in a correct and appropriate way
  •  You evaluate and critically use a wide range of sources of information in an historical context to investigate the set issue
  •  You use selected evidence to reach a reasoned and substantiated conclusion about the issue. This will be by looking at the strengths and limitations of the evidence

Causation

  • You explain your reasons using PEEL paragraphs effectively
  • You include an introduction and conclusion.
  • You are able to explain why some reasons are more important than others and how they are inter-linked
  • You explain in detail the significance of the different causes and make a supported judgement
  • You explain and begin to analyse links between the reasons, examples and explanations

MATHEMATICS
 

Algebra and equations 

  • Solve quadratic equations algebraically by factorising
  • Factorise quadratic expressions of the form x2 + bx + c including the difference of 2 squares.

FDP

  • Use formal algebraic proofs to convert recurring decimals into fractions

Graphs

  • Recognise, sketch, draw and interpret quadratic functions
  • Identify and interpret gradients and intercepts of linear functions graphically and algebraically
  • Find the equation of the line through two given points, or through one point with a given gradient
  • Calculate the gradient of a straight line given two points or from an equation

Measures

  • Convert between units of area and volume
  • Derive and apply formulae to calculate and solve problems involving: perimeter and area of triangles, parallelograms, trapezia, volume of cuboids (including cubes) and other prisms (including cylinders)
  • Measure line segments and angles in geometric figures, including interpreting maps and scale drawings and use of bearings

Number

  • Simplify expressions using the rules of surds
  • Rationalise a denominator
  • Simplify surds

Probability

  • Apply the property that the probabilities of mutually exclusive events sum to 1

Ratio and proportion

  • Understand that X is inversely proportional to Y is equivalent to X is proportional to 1/Y
  • Make links to similarity (including trigonometric ratios) 
  • Use compound units such as density and pressure 
  • Compare lengths, areas and volumes using ratio notation scale factors 
  • Use compound units such as speed, rates of pay, unit pricing 

Sequences

  • Recognise and use sequences of triangular, square and cube numbers and simple arithmetic progressions
  • Recognise geometric sequences and appreciate other sequences that arise

Shapes and construction

  • Use the properties of faces, surfaces, edges and vertices of cubes, cuboids, prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones and spheres to solve problems in 3-D
  • Derive and use the sum of angles in a triangle and use it to deduce the angle sum in any polygon, and to derive properties of regular polygons
  • Understand and use the relationship between parallel lines and alternate and corresponding angles
  • Apply the properties of angles at a point, angles at a point on a straight line, vertically opposite angles
  • Interpret plans and elevations of 3D shapes

Statistics

  • Use and interpret scatter graphs of bivariate data
  • Describe simple mathematical relationships between two variables in observational and experimental contexts and illustrate using scatter graphs
  • Infer properties of populations or distributions from a sample, whilst knowing the limitations of sampling
  • Apply statistics to describe a population
  • Interpret, analyse and compare the distributions of data sets from univariate empirical distributions through: - appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous and grouped data -appropriate measures of central tendency and spread 

MUSIC 

Performing 

  • Delivers an accurate and fluent performance of a melody line and chords simultaneously. 
  • Demonstrates secure ensemble, pulse and leadership skills within a group performance. 

Composing 

  • Makes imaginative use of ideas and conventions of Ternary Form. Creates a well-structured composition showing development of the initial ideas, a range of textures, successful and contrasting chord sequences for each section. 
  • Produces 3 or more ostinati which fit together musically and use shifting and phasing throughout their piece across more than one part. 
  • Constructs an imaginative radio advert which contains voice-over, underscoring and a memorable jingle. All aspects of the advert are original, well thought out and show attention to detail. Underscoring is a musical composition in its own right.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

  • Consistently use more advanced techniques 
  • Perform the correct skill when in direct competition with accuracy
  • Gain a high degree of success when performing skills and techniques 
  • Apply different skills at the correct time to apply pressure to your opponent 
  • Effectively  work with others and lead your team to success
  • Plan practices to improve your own and others performance
  • Plan an exercise programme to improve your health and performance
  • Successfully lead a warm up or part of the lesson independently

SCIENCE
 

Practicals

Hypothesis: Using scientific understanding to explain how one variable would affect another

Variables: Student can identify compound variables and highlight the most significant variable to be controlled.

Risk assessment: Major hazards, risk and precaution given and justified.  A student explains what will happen if significant risks are not minimised.

Diagram: The best piece of equipment for a particular measurement is selected and justified.

Measurements: Detail of how both variables could be measured with a high degree of resolution and of how the control variables will be monitored.  Students repeat readings and look critically for anomalous data.

Fair Test: Students explain how complex control variables will affect a fair and valid test.  Control variables are measured and checked for consistency.

Results Table: Unaided, a student records results or observations in a clear table with accurate headings and units and all numerical data given to a consistent number of decimal places or significant figures

Graph: Appropriate graph, both axes labelled with quantity/unit, line of best fit, title to include both IV and DV.  Graphs are used to derive relationships between variables and to assess the validity of the experiment.

Calculations: Complex calculations are carried unaided with appropriate units and significant figures.  Errors are quantified and used to assess the validity of the data and the experiment as a whole.

Conclusion: The relationship between the IV and the DV is derived from the numerical analysis and some examples of data to support the conclusion.  The conclusion is supported by detailed scientific knowledge and linked to the original hypothesis and context.

Errors: Anomalous data are identified, explained and the effect on the overall experiment evaluated.  Systematic errors are quantified and linked to any derived relationship or value obtained from the experiment.  The student can assess whether the systematic error negates the validity of the experiment or not.

Validity and reproducibility: The student looks critically and their own and other's data in order to assess the validity of the overall experiment.

Evaluation of method: Critical statements about the method in relation to the evaluation of data.  Detailed improvements are suggested and justified.

Development: Detailed scientific questions are asked to improve or extend an investigation, linking always to scientific knowledge and suitable contexts.

SPANISH 

Reading

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in both English and TL which includes unpredictable and unknown language.
  • Translate longer texts from TL-English with little ambiguity.
  • Use context/strategies to work out meaning of a text accurately.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a range of pronouns.
  • Understand where distracters are used.
  • Recognise a range of language features, e.g. comparatives, superlatives, negation, modal verbs and frequency expressions.

Writing

  • Translate longer passages into TL isolated errors.
  • Write longer, extended passages with little ambiguity/isolated errors.
  • Wide range of language features, e.g. three tenses with a range of pronouns and irregular verbs.
  • Very accurate spelling.
  • Use of more complex language features, e.g. range of negatives, complex opinions, modal verbs, comparatives and superlatives, range of justifications and frequency expressions. Some use of synonyms to avoid repetition
  • Coherent, relevant, sequenced ideas.

Speaking

  • Take part in an extended conversation with little ambiguity.
  • Almost all pronunciation and intonation accurate.
  • Respond to unpredictable questions with good spontaneity and accuracy.
  • Ask a wide range of questions accurately.
  • Use a wide range of language features eg. three tenses, all pronouns, comparatives and superlatives.
  • Apply grammatical knowledge to a range of new contexts/ manipulate language successfully.
  • Conversation sounds natural with student taking initiative. 

Listening

  • Give extended, accurate answers to comprehension questions in English and TL which includes unpredictable and unknown language (longer dialogue/monologue).
  • Use context/strategies to work out meaning of language accurately.
  • Recognise at least three tenses.
  • Understand where distracters are used.
  • Recognise comparatives, superlatives, negation, modal verbs and frequency expressions