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Highdown School
and Sixth Form Centre

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WHAT DOES EXCELLENCE LOOK LIKE IN EACH SUBJECT IN YEAR 9?

ART
 

Students who are exceeding the expectations in Art and Design will typically be providing evidence of achievement which consistently extends their learning beyond the confines of the task. They are working in ways which show deeper understanding and mastery and which are above the norm for their peer group. There are four keys areas in which students will demonstrate excellence:

Knowledge [AO1]

  • Independently research into the work of others
  • Learn about materials and techniques by studying the work of others
  • Understand and explain how different types of art and design can convey mood and meaning
  • Confidently analyse and select characteristics from their study of other artists
  • Understand the context and meaning behind some of the artwork
  • Use specialist vocabulary when describing own and others work
  • Select contextual and other sources to inform their work

Making [AO2]

  • Show high quality skills in making Art, Craft and Design
  • Design & develop ideas
  • Extend practical skills by using sketchbooks, virtual tools and other means to develop ideas and explore creative approaches
  • Use different materials, techniques and processes with confidence

Generating Ideas [AO3]

  • Show high quality skills when recording
  • Experiment with drawing and design techniques to produce expressive work
  • Understand and apply the visual elements
  • Produce independent and high quality observational drawing
  • Skilfully record ideas, observations and insights

Completion and Evaluation [AO4]

  • Skills of judgement and evaluation
  • Carefully evaluate their own work and that of others against success criteria to identify actions needed to strengthen their work
  • Realise intentions; producing a high quality and original final piece which develops from the project theme
  • Considered presentation throughout a project
  • Present final ideas
  • Demonstrate links between own and others work

CHINESE MANDARIN 

Reading
  • Recognise 3 tenses with some phrases.
  • Understand detailed information in a simple sentence and translate it from TL-English with no ambiguity.
  • Understand detailed  information in a paragraph despite of distracters and answer questions in English with good accuracy.
  • Understand the majority of ideas in authentic material.

Listening

  • Understand 3 tenses with some time phrases.
  • Understand detailed information in a simple statement and answer relevant questions with good accuracy.
  • Understand detailed information in a conversation in spite of distracters and answer questions in English with good accuracy.
  • Understand the majority of ideas ideas in authentic material.

Writing

  • Write information in simple sentences with non ambiguity in characters without pinyin and in complex sentences with some ambiguity in characters in majority with few pinyin.
  • Express opinions and reasons with a range of vocabulary. Use of some conjunctions, intensifiers and time phrases.
  • Most characters are accurately written.
  • Translate simple sentences from English to accurate characters without pinyin. Translate complex sentences in characters in majority with few pinyin with some ambiguity.

Speaking

  • Present information in simple sentences with no ambiguity and in complex sentences with few ambiguity.
  • Respond to known and unpredictable questions in simple sentences and some complex sentences.
  • Express opinions and reasons with a range of vocabulary. Use of some conjunctions, intensifiers and time phrases.
  • Ask simple questions in target language  with no ambiguity.
  • Pronunciation is understandable and doesn’t affect communication. 

COMPUTING 

Computer Science

  • Identify internal and external components within a computer system and describe their purpose.
  • Identify and explain the purpose of key components used in LAN
  • Design simple networks to solve real world problems
  • Design and implement relational databases consisting of 3 of more tables. 
  • Design and implement simple websites using HTML and CSS. 
  • Explain the similarities and differences between computerised everyday devices.
  • Explain how computers connect to the internet.
  • Identify benefits and limitations of using IT both inside and outside school.
  • Use IT safely and responsibly.
  • Describe people and events in the history of computing and make links between them

Programming

  • Students will use a syntactic version of the general purpose python language to solve problems. 
  • Students describe more complex algorithms, for example, sorting or searching algorithms.
  • Students can describe systems and their components using diagrams.
  • Students can fully decompose a problem into its sub-problems and can make use of a notation to represent it.
  • Students can confidently use at least two forms of iteration and one method of selection
  • Students use programming interfaces to make predictions and vary the rules within the programs. 
  • Students assess the validity of their programs by considering or comparing alternative solutions.
  • Students are capable of independently writing longer programs consisting of several procedures
  • Students make use of procedures with parameters and functions returning values in their programs and are also able to manipulate 2-dimensional arrays or more complex list structures.  

DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
 

Four innovative design ideas drawn using the most appropriate 3D technique. Designs are annotated effectively using the ACCESSFM headings.

Two well-reasoned developments of best design. 

Students are able to select and use tools and equipment independently and accurately.

Quality of finish is high. 

Work is fully evaluated reflecting on all stages. Students are able to request and act on comments from others and producing improvements based on suggestions.

DRAMA 

Making
  • Students are able to work imaginatively and creatively in collaborative contexts, generating, developing and communicating ideas.
  • Students can recall drama skills and apply them creatively to develop and explore practical work.
  • Students can show commitment to their drama lessons and go above and beyond what is expected of them – They can spend time outside of lessons preparing for performances.
  • Students can show an independent and mature approach to their own progress and use feedback to help develop their work further.
  • Students are able to develop an increasing understanding of genre and styles of drama.

Performing

  • Students are able to develop and perform a creative and original character, showing an understanding of different styles and genres of drama.
  • Students are developing an awareness of staging configurations and its impact on the audience.
  • Students can use different performance conventions, non-linear timelines / abstract work correctly
  • The purpose of the piece is clear to the audience. They can follow the story.

Responding

  • Students can evaluate the work of their peers and suggest inventive and creative ways for them to improve their drama.
  • Students can show critical awareness of work in progress and performance, of their own contribution and that of others.
  • Students can use appropriate terminology; they are able to support their views with relevant reasons, demonstrating the ability to take work forward.
  • Students can demonstrate a good understanding of the theory of the style in use, including reference to any relevant practitioners and have a good awareness of the social, historical, political and cultural context of the work.
  • Evaluations will be written clearly and contain detailed justifications of student’s opinions.

ENGLISH 

Writing
  • convincing and compelling communication of ideas in a wide range of forms
  • extensive and ambitious use of structural devices and paragraphs for effect
  • extensive and ambitious use of vocabulary for effect
  • full range of sentence structures for clarity, effect and creativity
  • precise, compelling and successful use of punctuation for effect
  • imaginative and convincing use of vocabulary for effect
  • accurate spelling throughout, including that of low frequency complex vocabulary

Reading

  • perceptive interpretations of ideas in texts
  • Perceptive evaluation of language and structure
  • Perceptive evaluation of ideas and perspectives
  • Perceptive evaluation of contexts

Speaking and Listening

  • explore wide range of subject matter with precision and confidence
  • manipulate talk according to context
  • challenge the thinking of others through choice of vocabulary and talk in group discussions
  • use role play to explore complex ideas with insight

FRENCH 

Reading

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in both English and French which includes unknown and unpredictable language.
  • Use strategies to work out the meaning of a text based on the context.
  • Translate longer, more complex texts from French-English with very few errors.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns.
  • Understand where distractors are used.
  • Recognise and correctly identify a wide range of language features, e.g. comparatives, superlatives, si clauses, negatives, modal verbs.

Listening

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in English and French which includes unknown and unpredictable language.
  • Use strategies to work out accurate meaning of words from the context.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a range of pronouns.
  • Recognise a wide range of language features including: comparatives, superlatives, si clauses, modal verbs, negation and frequency expressions.

Writing

  • Translate long passages into French which include complex vocabulary with very few errors.
  • Write long, extended, more complex passages with very few errors.
  • Use a wide range of language features, e.g. at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns and irregular verbs.
  • Very accurate spelling.
  • Consistently accurate use of more complex language features, e.g. negatives, modal verbs, si clauses, comparatives, superlatives, complex opinions, frequency expressions.
  • Use of synonyms to avoid repetition
  • Coherent, relevant, sequenced ideas.

Speaking

  • Take part in an extended conversation with very few, isolated errors.
  • Excellent accuracy in pronunciation and intonation.
  • Respond to unpredictable questions confidently with good spontaneity and accuracy.
  • Ask a range of questions accurately.
  • Use a wide range of language features, e.g. at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns, si clauses, negatives, modal verbs, comparatives and superlatives.
  • Apply grammatical knowledge to a range of new contexts/ manipulate language successfully.
  • Conversation sounds natural with student taking initiative.

GEOGRAPHY 

Enquiry
  • I ask insightful, thought provoking geographical questions that draw on a wide range of experiences and seek to enhance my understanding
  • I use a wide range of sources/equipment independently found.
  • I assess the reliability of sources and can evaluate the impact of where the evidence has come from.
  • I can critically evaluate a geographical investigation and by reflecting on this offer suitable suggestions for changes/improvements
  • I can critically comment on a source/piece of evidence using my geographical understanding
  • Can gather, analyse (including data manipulation) and evaluate information in order to draw detailed conclusions supported by evidence.

Geographical skills and application

  • I can use mapping techniques in answering questions,  dealing with geographical issues and formulating hypotheses
  • I can select which mapping techniques are appropriate to various tasks and apply them accurately and effectively
  • I can gather, analyse and evaluate information from a range of different maps
  • I can understand the idea of scale of maps and can use different types of maps drawn to differing scales.
  • I can produce maps that show a range of different data
  • I can calculate gradient from a range of different maps.

Interdependence

  • Can evaluate the impact of my own decisions on the world in a variety of places at a variety of scales.
  • Can use a critical approach to inform their decisions, becoming an independent citizen.
  • Can recognise the complex connections around us and begin to think like a Geographer in relation to issues we have studied but also in the real world.
  • Can evaluate in detail the social, economic and environmental impacts of decisions at a variety of different scales with detailed and relevant evidence to support.
  • Can justify their own decisions and suggest solutions that consider a variety of factors at multiple scales, not just from content studied in class.
  • Can analyse in detail how things are considered sustainable (economic, social and environmental), consider how these are interconnected at a variety of scales, with detailed consideration of multiplier effect/ knock-on effects. 

Place

  • Evaluates the context of a range of places on a development continuum (not just rich and poor – HICs/MICs/LICs - NICs)
  • Synthesises information across a variety of locations, contexts and scales to recognise complex links
  • Confidently analyses a range of economic, social, political and cultural processes that influence places
  • Understands that different people hold different views about places and can justify these viewpoints

HISTORY
 

Source evaluation

  • You evaluate and critically use a wide range of sources of information in an historical context to investigate the set issue
  • You look at a range of sources and compared them by looking at content, origin and purpose in detail
  • You can assess the usefulness and reliability of sources by looking at the strengths and limitations of the sources
  • You use your own knowledge to assess the strengths and limitations of the sources

Interpretations

  • You select, organise and deploy accurate and relevant historical knowledge. This will be in your introduction and will be used effectively and consistently throughout your answer
  • You show that you can analyse  a variety of interpretations through the use of evidence
  • The answer is communicated well and historical terminology has been used throughout your answer in a correct and appropriate way
  • You can evaluate the value of different interpretations through placing them in their historical context
  • You use a range of relevant evidence to reach a reasoned and substantiated conclusion about the issue. This will be by looking at the strengths and limitations of the evidence within a historical context and using your own knowledge of the period

Causation

  • You have used your own knowledge to contextualise the different causes
  • Independent research is used to fully substantiate judgements made
  • PEEL is consistently used for all main paragraphs
  • You give multiple examples for each cause and you fully explain each cause
  • Sophisticated historical terminology is used throughout
  • Causes are fully linked to show a full understanding of causation
  • All causes are fully compared and contrasted to show their significance
  • You include a detailed introduction and conclusion focused clearly on the question

MATHEMATICS 

Algebra and equations
  • Solve quadratic equations by completing the square
  • Solve quadratic equations algebraically by the quadratic formula 
  • Solve quadratic equations algebraically by factorising including those that require rearrangement
  • Factorise quadratic expressions of the form ax2 + bx + c 

FDP

  • Use formal algebraic proofs to convert recurring decimals into fractions

  • Solve problems involving compound interest including financial mathematics

Graphs

  • Deduce roots algebraically
  • Identify and interpret roots, intercepts and turning points of quadratic functions graphically
  • Use linear and quadratic graphs to estimate values of y for given values of x and vice versa and to find approximate solutions of simultaneous linear equations

Measures

  • Calculate arc lengths, angles and areas of sectors of circles
  • Surface area and volume of spheres, pyramids, cones and composite solids

Number

  • Solve equations which may be written in surd form.
  • Expand brackets where the terms may be written in surd form

Probability

  • Calculate the probability of independent and dependent combined events, including using tree diagrams and other representations, and know the underlying assumptions
  • Understand that empirical unbiased samples tend towards theoretical probability distributions, with increasing sample size

Ratio and proportion

  • Interpret the gradient of a straight-line graph as a rate of change
  • Set up, solve and interpret the answers in growth and decay problems, including compound interest
  • Recognise and interpret graphs that illustrate direct and inverse proportion
  • Interpret equations that describe direct and inverse proportion 

Sequences

  • Deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of quadratic sequences
  • Recognise and use sequences including Fibonacci -type sequences, quadratic sequences and simple geometric progressions (rn where n is an integer and r is a rational number >0)
  • Recognise sequences that are convergent, divergent or oscillating

Shapes and constructions

  • Know the exact values of sin θ and cos θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45° , 60° and 90° know the exact value of tan θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45° , 60°
  • Apply the trigonometric ratios to find angles and lengths in right-angled triangles and, where possible, general triangles in two and three dimensional figures
  • Apply the trigonometric ratios to find angles and lengths in right-angled triangles in two dimensional figures
  • Know the trigonometric ratios, sinopposite adjacent
  • Apply addition and subtraction of vectors, multiplication of vectors by a scalar, and diagrammatic and column representations of vectors
  • Use the standard ruler and compass constructions to construct given figures and solve loci problems
  • Derive and use the standard ruler and compass constructions (perpendicular bisector of a line segment, constructing a perpendicular to a given line from/at a given point, bisecting a given angle) recognise and use the perpendicular distance from a point to a line as the shortest distance to the line
  • Apply angle facts, triangle congruence, similarity and properties of quadrilaterals to conjecture and derive results about angles and sides, including Pythagoras’ theorem and the fact that the base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal, and use known results to obtain simple proofs
  • Know the formulae for: Pythagoras’ theorem, a2 + b2 = c2
  • Use the basic congruence criteria for triangles (SSS, SAS, ASA, RHS)
  • Construct and interpret plans and elevations of 3D shapes
  • Including: tangent, arc, sector and segment
  • Identify and apply circle definitions and properties, including: centre, radius, chord, diameter, circumference 
  • Including fractional scale factors for enlargement

Statistics

  • Interpolate and extrapolate apparent trends whilst knowing the dangers of so doing 
  • Make Predictions
  • Draw estimated lines of best fit
  • Know that correlation does not indicate causation
  • Recognise correlations

MUSIC 

Film Themes - Performing
  • I achieved a stylish and accurate performance of my chosen film theme
  • I played the melody line and chords accurately with a good sense of pulse. An occasional slip did not interrupt the flow of the piece
  • I can accurately perform a film theme melody line with a good sense of pulse
  • My melody was accurate in pitch but lacked a sense of pulse
  • I attempted to perform a section of my chosen film theme

Pop Music - Performing

  • I performed the chord sequence and melody simultaneously with no slips
  • I performed the chord sequence and melody simultaneously with some minor slips
  • I performed the chord sequence or melody accurately with good ensemble skills
  • I played the chord sequence or melody accurately but I need to improve my  ensemble skills
  • I performed part of the chord sequence or melody

Blues - Composing

  • My composition is imaginative showing development through advanced improvisational skills and a real understanding of phrasing and balance.
  • My composition is a well-structured composition developing initial ideas through successful improvisation.
  • My composition demonstrates a clear Blues structure with minimal development. I have attempted improvisation
  • My composition demonstrates the basics of the Blues with a repetitive rather than improvisatory melody
  • I contributed to the final group composition 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
 

  • Consistently use more advanced techniques with precision and control
  • Perform a full range of skills with accuracy when in direct competition
  • Adapt your play to achieve a high degree of success and apply pressure to your opponent 
  • Apply tactics and strategies to take control of play
  • Use your teams strengths to lead them to success
  • Plan practices to improve your own and others performance, offering one to one coaching
  • Develop targets to improve your own and others health and performance
  • Successfully adapt the teachers task to lead a small group

SCIENCE 

Practicals

Hypothesis: Using scientific understanding to explain how one variable would affect another. Comment on relationships and trends, including anomalies.

Variables: Student can identify compound variables and highlight the most significant variable to be controlled.

Risk assessment: Major hazards, risks and precautions given and justified.  A student explains what will happen if significant risks are not minimised and what actions should be taken if mitigation strategies are inadequate.

Diagram: The best piece of equipment for a particular measurement is selected and justified. Resolution of specific instruments is quoted and cross-referenced to requirement for repeat readings or other relevant adjustments to recording.

Measurements: Details of how both variables could be measured with a high degree of resolution and of how the control variables will be monitored.  Students repeat readings and look critically for anomalous data. Students comment on reliability of data and any decisions to re-take any measurements.

Fair Test: Students explain how complex control variables will affect a fair and valid test.  Control variables are measured and checked for consistency. Students comment on the extent to which the inadvertent change of a control variable could influence the results.

Results Table: Unaided, a student records results or observations in a clear table with accurate headings and units and all numerical data given to a consistent number of decimal places or significant figures. Students manipulate data in a table by executing further calculations (e.g. averages).

Graph: Appropriate graph, both axes labelled with quantity/unit, line of best fit, title to include both IV and DV.  Graphs are used to derive relationships between variables and to assess the validity of the experiment. Students can describe trends and predict data from extrapolation.

Calculations: Complex calculations are carried unaided with appropriate units and significant figures.  Errors are quantified and used to assess the validity of the data and the experiment as a whole. Students comment on errors and can reflect on how they affect outcomes.

Conclusion: The relationship between the IV and the DV is derived from the numerical analysis and some examples of data to support the conclusion.  The conclusion is supported by detailed scientific knowledge and linked to the original hypothesis and context. Reference to anomalies, risks and errors is included in the conclusion.

Errors: Anomalous data are identified, explained and the effect on the overall experiment evaluated.  Systematic errors are quantified and linked to any derived relationship or value obtained from the experiment. The student can assess whether the systematic error negates the validity of the experiment or not. Students can clearly distinguish between systematic, zero and random errors.

Validity and reproducibility: The student looks critically at their own and other's data in order to assess the validity of the overall experiment. Students make the link between the data and their hypothesis.

Evaluation of method: Critical statements about the method in relation to the evaluation of data. Detailed improvements are suggested and justified. Improvements include reference to how modifications will reduce experimental error.

Development: Detailed scientific questions are asked to improve or extend an investigation, linking always to scientific knowledge and suitable contexts. Practical knowledge is consolidated through GCSE-style questions that link to required practical work.

SPANISH 

Reading

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in both English and Spanish which includes unknown and unpredictable language.
  • Use strategies to work out the meaning of a text based on the context.
  • Translate longer, more complex texts from Spanish-English with very few errors.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns.
  • Understand where distractors are used.
  • Recognise and correctly identify a wide range of language features, e.g. comparatives, superlatives, si clauses, negatives, modal verbs.

Listening

  • Give extended answers to comprehension questions in English and Spanish which includes unknown and unpredictable language.
  • Use strategies to work out accurate meaning of words from the context.
  • Recognise at least three tenses with a range of pronouns.
  • Recognise a wide range of language features including: comparatives, superlatives, si clauses, modal verbs, negation and frequency expressions.

Writing

  • Translate long passages into Spanish which include complex vocabulary with very few errors.
  • Write long, extended, more complex passages with very few errors.
  • Use a wide range of language features, e.g. at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns and irregular verbs.
  • Very accurate spelling.
  • Consistently accurate use of more complex language features, e.g. negatives, modal verbs, si clauses, comparatives, superlatives, complex opinions, frequency expressions.
  • Use of synonyms to avoid repetition
  • Coherent, relevant, sequenced ideas.

Speaking

  • Take part in an extended conversation with very few, isolated errors.
  • Excellent accuracy in pronunciation and intonation.
  • Respond to unpredictable questions confidently with good spontaneity and accuracy.
  • Ask a range of questions accurately.
  • Use a wide range of language features, e.g. at least three tenses with a wide range of pronouns, si clauses, negatives, modal verbs, comparatives and superlatives.
  • Apply grammatical knowledge to a range of new contexts/ manipulate language successfully.
  • Conversation sounds natural with student taking initiative.